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Photographing 3-D Artwork: Ali Crank November 17, 2009

Posted by claralieu in Applied Arts, Architecture, photography, Student blog posts.
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Today I’d like to feature a guest blog post from Wellesley College student Ali Crank, class of 2011 who attended the Applied Arts WorkshopPhotographing 3-D Artwork” last weekend with architectural photographer Warren Patterson.  Ali photographed her architectural model on her own prior to the workshop, as seen below.

Ali Crank, Class of 2011

After taking the Applied Arts WorkshopPhotographing 3-D Artwork” with Warren, she proceeded to use his techniques for lighting, set up, and Photoshop to re-do her photograph of her model again. As you can see, her results are visually captivating and professional-exactly what an architecture student needs for their applications and portfolio.

Ali Crank, Class of 2011

“As an aspiring architect, I came to this workshop hoping to learn techniques that would help me better prepare my portfolio. Before I took this class, I shot my model using what I knew of photography, but I knew the images didn’t do my design justice. I had no idea that the workshop would also give me a completely different perspective on photographing models and art; it too is an advanced art form. The concept that best stuck with me was that a good photographer only needs one picture to fully capture the essence of the model. Like the piece, the image should reiterate, emphasize, and augment the design. These photographs became as compelling as the pieces themselves, sometimes more so.

I was amazed that so many careful preparations are cued in order to ensure that the photographer can get the best shot of the model. The image itself became a work of art, not just a photograph. As a result, in the photograph, I saw my architectural model transform from a small structure made of balsa wood, acetate, and museum board to an actual inhabitable space.” –Ali Crank, Class of 2011


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