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Pedagogy Through Photography: Daisy Zhang, ’11 October 29, 2010

Posted by claralieu in photography, Student blog posts.
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Today’s blog post is by Daisy Zhang, ’11 who curated the exhibition “Pedagogy Through Photography: Photographs by Clarence Kennedy“, which is currently on view in the Sculpture Court, on the 3rd floor of the Jewett Arts Center. Stop by and see the exhibition!

Pedagogy Through Photography

“The process of putting together my exhibition: Pedagogy through Photography: Photographs by Clarence Kennedy, has been an exciting and fun learning experience.  Kennedy was a photographer in the 1920s and 1930s who took photographs of Italian Renaissance sculpture for pedagogical purposes. Wellesley has many of his photographs and three complete bound folios as well.When I first started this project, I did not know anything about Kennedy or how to turn my work into an exhibit, and I especially did not know how much work that would involve.  As a senior art history major, the idea of curating an exhibit has always been on my mind but I did not think that it would be possible to do while I was at school and therefore, this has been very educational.  I did most of my research over the summer and went to places like the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC and the Harvard Fine Arts Library.  I also compiled some photographs from our own Wellesley Archives to include in the exhibit as well.  Through doing this, I learned a tremendous amount about Clarence Kennedy but the difficult part of putting his works together into a show was probably the most daunting part.  I started this by writing first drafts of my three main labels for the show.  One was about Kennedy’s technique, the other about his life, and the third about the teaching of art and art history at Wellesley.  While these labels were being edited, I picked the photographs that I was going to use in the exhibit and wrote “tombstone” labels for those, which is just the name of the artist, title, year and any other information.

Once the labels were completed, they needed to be printed out but before that, I hung up the photographs in the Sculpture Court in their right organization.  This involved grouping them and making sure they were even with the floor and each other.  However, apart from just hanging up the photographs, I also needed a frame and a glass case for some other objects.  The glass case was meant for the ledger that recorded the art department purchases of Kennedy’s work along with a bound folio whereas the frame was meant to show how students learned form these images.  These two objects were the finishing part of my exhibit and the last to be completed.  Currently, everything is hung up and in their respective spots and it is very rewarding to see my finished work.  Kennedy’s photographs were meant to be seen by students everyday and it’s nice to see, that even though these photographs are no longer used, they can still be shown to students.”-Daisy Zhang, ’11

Pedagogy Through Photography

Pedagogy Through Photography

Pedagogy Through Photography

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Tamara Al-Mashouk on installing “Senior Thesis Exhibition” May 11, 2010

Posted by claralieu in installation, Installing Exhibitions, sculpture, Student blog posts.
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Today’s blog post is by Tamara Al-Mashouk, class of 2010 who completed work on her thesis in this year’s Senior Thesis Exhibition. Below you can read her thoughts on working in the gallery this past week.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

The installation of my work began with setting up the standing bookcase. I decided where I wanted to place it, then laid out the eleven frames and four wall shelves. I had had an idea for how I wanted my side of the gallery to be arranged, but chose not to finalize my plans. I wanted the set up to come together as fluidly as the work itself; organically with very little sketching and planning.

Senior Thesis: Installation in Progress

After working out the structure of the show, I started bringing in the tiny objects I had created. I placed them sporadically, moving from the bookcase to the shelves, and onto the frames. I aimed to create a perfect chaos. When all the objects were finally in the gallery I sought to rearrange them to create interactions and an ethereal atmosphere. -Tamara Al-Mashouk

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

Ji Young Lim on installing “Senior Thesis Exhibition” May 11, 2010

Posted by claralieu in installation, Installing Exhibitions, Student blog posts.
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Senior Thesis: Installation in Progress

Today’s blog post is by Ji Young Lim, class of 2010 who completed work on her thesis in this year’s Senior Thesis Exhibition. Below are her thoughts and reflections on the process of installing her work in the gallery last week.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

After a year of preparing my senior thesis installation, it was finally time for it to come into actual physical existence. Tamara and I worked on installing our show for three days and those three days were both frustrating and exhilarating. We spent most of those three days in the gallery working. I had no idea how physically draining installing my piece would be nor did I expect it to take me most of the three days to complete installing. Andy (Mowbray) helped me put up the framework for all my yarn and helped me put up the top mirror. Then I spent the next two days tying on each piece of yarn and braiding them. It was a painstakingly time consuming process, however, I am quite proud of the outcome. I could not have done it without help from the art department faculty and the gallery assistants. So thank you!

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

I had never put up such a large piece before and it was quite a learning experience as well as an incredibly rewarding one. This entire experience has been one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had. Seeing my piece go up after all the hard work and effort put into it and seeing it come into existence was beyond anything I have ever experienced. -Ji Young Lim

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

Madeline Vara on installing “350: Student Exhibition” April 15, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Installing Exhibitions, painting, Student blog posts, Student Exhibitions.
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Today’s post is a guest blog post by Madeline Vara, Class of 2010.  Madeline completed a 350 level project and is participating in “350: Student Exhibition“ which has an opening reception next Tuesday, April 20 at 4:45pm. In her post, she discusses the process and experience of installing her project into the gallery space.

“This past Monday, we began the installation for the 350 show.  Though all of the 350 students participating in the show, myself included, were displaying paintings, I found myself with a bit of predicament concerning how to present my artwork.  In the case of the other 350 students, their paintings were all on large stretches of canvas, set to be easily hung on the walls.  My project had left me with 22 various small paintings, though, with all of them on paper.

Madeline Vara

While I could have just as easily posted my paintings in mass along the wall, I couldn’t help but feel that it wouldn’t do the art justice.  As a result, I embarked on small mission to complete a three dimensional installation of my work by creating shelves to display them on.  After buying a multitude of hardware supplies, I set out to create a 7-foot long shelf and multiple smaller shelves.  The all-day affair of painting them, deciding their places on the wall, and finally drilling them into place was tiring, but ultimately worth every minute.  Viewing art isn’t just about the painting or drawing or sculpture itself; it is deeply tied in with the space the object occupies and the mode through which we view it.  Installing the shelves was essential to creating the right “frame” for my paintings.”- Madeline Vara, Class of 2010

Installing "350: Student Exhibition"

Madeline Vara works to install her pieces into the gallery space.

Madeline Vara

Eleri Roberts on “Look at Me” February 3, 2010

Posted by claralieu in photography, Student blog posts, Student Exhibitions.
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Today’s post is a guest blog post from Eleri Roberts, one of the students who has work in the “Look at Me” exhibition.  Below are her thoughts and experience on the curatorial process and installing the exhibition in the gallery.

The process of putting together the show has been a learning experience. It has been everything from fun to frustrating. The class first discussed the show early in the fall semester. At that point we thought of splitting the show into three themes that we would hope to unify in some way. We went down that path for some time, but eventually came to the conclusion that we needed a more cohesive show. It seemed to us that the show would be stronger if we unified all the artists as a whole instead of separating them into groups. This was the point at which we layed all the photos put and began connecting each body of work to another, whether it was through visual and aesthetic connections or through subject matter and meaning. We ended up with a circle that immediately felt right and even showed us how the show would be organized and structured.

Look at Me: Installation in Progress

Eleri Roberts and Christine Rogers work on installing the exhibition.

Now I will jump to the actual process of putting up the show in the Jewett Gallery. We quickly realized that there was no way we would be able to put up everyone’s complete final project without fully overwhelming the visitors to the gallery. It became clear that less is more. We then started the difficult task of editing each artist’s final project down to three or four prints. Not an easy task considering everyone had so many great photos! A few of the ARTS208 class members as well as Christine Rogers were there to give their input and eventually the selections were made. Now for the calculations! Christine, Emily, Rayla, and I spent a long time measuring, re-measuring, calculating, and re-calculating all of the distances needed between photos in order to put together a perfectly balanced show. Finally everything was figured out and we could start the hanging. With only a few mishaps, the end of the entire process was in sight. Just some lettering and labeling to do.

A long day with a lot of thought, but the end product was well worth it. I learned so much about the curatorial process as well as the work of a gallery preparator. I am so proud of our class. I am really looking forward to the show and hope to see you there! -Eleri Roberts

Eleri Roberts

Eleri Roberts, “Untitled”, silver gelatin prints, 2009

Eliza Murphy on installing “Spine: Senior Exhibition” December 7, 2009

Posted by claralieu in Installing Exhibitions, painting, Student blog posts, Student Exhibitions.
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Today’s post is a guest blog post from senior Eliza Murphy, who has a series of large scale, self-portraits painted in oil on canvas in our current exhibition “SPINE: Senior Exhibition”. Read below about her experience installing her work in the gallery last week.

Installing "Spine"

This Thursday we set up our show “Spine”. I must say I wasn’t anticipating such a long day, but it was worth it and the show looks great. Early in the day, Clara taught me all about attaching D- rings to my canvases and how to measure and space for my paintings. I am very pleased to have mastered these new skills. After many attempts and adjustments to my measurements, hanging and re-hanging, hanging and re-hanging, everything is in order and looks grand, if I do say so myself. I am excited to see what kind of response our show elicits.

Spine: Senior Exhibition: Installation

Eliza Murphy, Class of 2010

Jenna Miller on installing “Spine: Senior Exhibition” December 5, 2009

Posted by claralieu in Architecture, sculpture, Student blog posts, Student Exhibitions.
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Today’s post is a guest blog post from senior Jenna Miller, who has a large scale installation titled “Frame” in our current exhibition “SPINE: Senior Exhibition”. Read below about her experience installing her work in the gallery over the past two days.

After 12+ hours worth of time in the gallery, I have finally completed installing “Frame”.  I arrived at the Jewett Art gallery around 8:30 yesterday morning to begin moving the components of my installation work from the studio into the gallery.  It ended up taking multiple trips (and multiple people) to move the stack of 2×4 wooden beams and my slabs of drywall into the space.

Spine: Senior Exhibition: Installation

Once we finished hauling materials and relocated a missing ladder, the gallery looked a bit like a construction site.  Eliza, Jess, and I then began the task of determining the layout of our show based on scale and the way our pieces talked to each other.

When I returned from class, the construction began.  I started building the wooden frame, which composes the structure of my work, with the help of Professor Andy Mowbray and my Independent Studies Advisor, Professor Daniela Rivera.  The 2x4s had warped because of the humidity and definitely put up a fight as we tried to straighten them into an orthogonal frame.  Ultimately, we were successful, and the framework was complete.

Spine: Senior Exhibition: Installation

We then created cable support mechanisms for my walls, and I attached my drywall slabs and plexi-glass onto the still horizontal wooden frames.  The next step took a couple of us standing up the assembled wall panel as Daniela scurried up the ladder to attach the cables to the beams.  It was great to see the first segment of my work standing for the first time, especially since this is the biggest scale work I have ever created.  I finished up the evening in the gallery by myself, touching up details and tidying up the space after the day’s whirlwind of activity.  Then I went home and slept—what a full day!

Spine: Senior Exhibition: Installation

This morning, Daniela and I stood up and hung the final panel, helped Jess to arrange her podiums, and adjusted the gallery lighting.  At the end of it all, we just sat back, sipped our much-needed coffee, and admired all of our hard work.

Spine: Senior Exhibition: Installation

Photographing 3-D Artwork: Ali Crank November 17, 2009

Posted by claralieu in Applied Arts, Architecture, photography, Student blog posts.
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Today I’d like to feature a guest blog post from Wellesley College student Ali Crank, class of 2011 who attended the Applied Arts WorkshopPhotographing 3-D Artwork” last weekend with architectural photographer Warren Patterson.  Ali photographed her architectural model on her own prior to the workshop, as seen below.

Ali Crank, Class of 2011

After taking the Applied Arts WorkshopPhotographing 3-D Artwork” with Warren, she proceeded to use his techniques for lighting, set up, and Photoshop to re-do her photograph of her model again. As you can see, her results are visually captivating and professional-exactly what an architecture student needs for their applications and portfolio.

Ali Crank, Class of 2011

“As an aspiring architect, I came to this workshop hoping to learn techniques that would help me better prepare my portfolio. Before I took this class, I shot my model using what I knew of photography, but I knew the images didn’t do my design justice. I had no idea that the workshop would also give me a completely different perspective on photographing models and art; it too is an advanced art form. The concept that best stuck with me was that a good photographer only needs one picture to fully capture the essence of the model. Like the piece, the image should reiterate, emphasize, and augment the design. These photographs became as compelling as the pieces themselves, sometimes more so.

I was amazed that so many careful preparations are cued in order to ensure that the photographer can get the best shot of the model. The image itself became a work of art, not just a photograph. As a result, in the photograph, I saw my architectural model transform from a small structure made of balsa wood, acetate, and museum board to an actual inhabitable space.” –Ali Crank, Class of 2011