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Opening for “Re-Presentation” November 19, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Opening Receptions, Student Exhibitions.
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Re-Presentation

On Tuesday we hosted an opening reception for the exhibition “Re-Presentation”, an exhibition by students in Daniela Rivera’s ARTS 317 course this semester. We had a great crowd, and it was amazing to see the diversity and range of work in the exhibition.  Students featured in the show include Yoojin Chung, Ali McKenna, Lucia Nhamo, Zsofia Schweger, Zoe Shladow,Lorraine Shim, and Laura Weyl.

Re-Presentation

Re-Presentation

Re-Presentation

Video: Senior Thesis Exhibition May 21, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Student Exhibitions, video.
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View this video featuring seniors Tamara Al-Mashouk and Ji Young Lim in the current 2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition exhibition on view at the gallery through May 28.  In the video Ji and Tamara speak about their influences and process in creating their pieces. The video was shot and edited by Paul Falcone from WCAC-TV.


Video with Ji Young Lim & Tamara Al-Mashouk, Class of 2010
Shot & edited by Paul Falcone from WCAC-TV


Senior Thesis: Opening Reception May 13, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Opening Receptions, Student Exhibitions.
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Our gallery season this year concluded with an opening reception of three student exhibitions:  Senior Thesis Exhibition featuring seniors Tamara Al-Mashouk and Ji Young Lim, It’s Personal featuring seniors Eleri Roberts and EB Bartels, and In the Rough, featuring Harriet Alexander, Kate Connolly, and Jenny Olivari from Professor Carlos Dorrien’s ARTS 307 Sculpture II course.  We had a great turnout for both receptions on Tuesday, May 11. The gallery is closed through the summer, but check out the 2010-2011 gallery schedule for a preview of our exhibitions.

It's Personal/In the Rough: Opening Reception

(above) It’s Personal featuring seniors Eleri Roberts and EB Bartels, and In the Rough, featuring Harriet Alexander, Kate Connolly, and Jenny Olivari from Professor Carlos Dorrien’s ARTS 307 Sculpture II course.

Senior Thesis Exhibition: Opening reception

(above) Tamara Al-Mashouk is interviewed by Paul Falcone, from WCAC-TV.

Senior Thesis Exhibition: Opening reception

(above) Senior Thesis Exhibition featuring seniors Tamara Al-Mashouk and Ji Young Lim

Senior Thesis Exhibition: Opening reception

(above) Senior Thesis Exhibition featuring seniors Tamara Al-Mashouk and Ji Young Lim


Tamara Al-Mashouk on installing “Senior Thesis Exhibition” May 11, 2010

Posted by claralieu in installation, Installing Exhibitions, sculpture, Student blog posts.
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Today’s blog post is by Tamara Al-Mashouk, class of 2010 who completed work on her thesis in this year’s Senior Thesis Exhibition. Below you can read her thoughts on working in the gallery this past week.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

The installation of my work began with setting up the standing bookcase. I decided where I wanted to place it, then laid out the eleven frames and four wall shelves. I had had an idea for how I wanted my side of the gallery to be arranged, but chose not to finalize my plans. I wanted the set up to come together as fluidly as the work itself; organically with very little sketching and planning.

Senior Thesis: Installation in Progress

After working out the structure of the show, I started bringing in the tiny objects I had created. I placed them sporadically, moving from the bookcase to the shelves, and onto the frames. I aimed to create a perfect chaos. When all the objects were finally in the gallery I sought to rearrange them to create interactions and an ethereal atmosphere. -Tamara Al-Mashouk

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

Senior Thesis Exhibition: Installation Complete May 10, 2010

Posted by claralieu in installation, sculpture, Student Exhibitions.
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The Senior Thesis Exhibition, featuring seniors Tamara Al-Mashouk and Ji Young Lim completed installation into the gallery at the end of last week.  To view all images from the exhibition, visit the Jewett Art Gallery’s Flickr Page.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

Join us as we close the 2009-2010 gallery season with an opening reception on Tuesday, May 11, 4:45-6pm. The opening also includes the 350 senior photography exhibition “It’s Personal” featuring EB Bartels & Eleri Roberts, and “In the Rough”, sculptures by students in Professor Carlos Dorrien’s ARTS 317 course.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

(above) detail of Ji Young Lim’s installation.

2010 Senior Thesis Exhibition

(above)detail of Tamara Al-Mashouk’s installation

Installing “350: Student Exhibition” April 13, 2010

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This morning we finished up the final stages of deinstalling “Transformations” and began installing “350: Student Exhibition“.  This student exhibition spotlights students who are doing 350 level projects this year as well as students in the ARTS217 Life Drawing course. Join us for the opening reception next Tuesday, April 20 from 4:45-6pm.

Deinstall: "Transformations"

The incoming student paintings are against the gallery wall, waiting to be installed into the gallery space.

Deinstall: "Transformations"

Nathalie Miebach works with a student gallery assistant to pack up her sculptures from the “Transformations” exhibition.

Installing "350: Student Exhibition"

Madeline Vara works to arrange her works on paper project onto a wooden shelf she installed into the gallery wall.

Installing "350: Student Exhibition"

Becky Parker’s oil paintings are on the left, with Wanda Xu’s landscape paintings and Laura Foley’s oil paintings of cupcakes on the right. To view all of the works in the exhibition, visit the Jewett Art Gallery’s Flickr Page.

Applied Arts: Sculptural Weaving Workshop March 15, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Applied Arts, sculpture.
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This past weekend we hosted the Sculptural Weaving workshop with Boston artist Nathalie Miebach, who is also one of the artists featured in the “Transformations” exhibition, currently on view at the Jewett Art Gallery through April 10. Miebach got the workshop started by providing everyone with a foundation to understand the materials, process, and history of weaving by examining woven objects she had brought in herself, images workshop participants brought with them, and also a slideshow which demonstrated these ideas in more depth.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Miebach explained that the weaves have not changed throughout history, but that the materials for weaving have. An example she brought with her to demonstrate this was a small woven bowl, created by the Zulu tribe using telephone wire to weave.  She also talked about how in contemporary woven works that both the materials and forms have departed from being purely functional.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Miebach displays a woven form she created which is based on a calendar of daylight and nightlight hours in Boston.

Referencing her examples, Miebach talked about the four kinds of weaves:
1) Coiling: a process where a material is wrapped around the reed. An  inner structure is created with other forms.
2) Twining: in this process there are “spokes” which are vertical, and are made of a thicker material, and the “weavers” which are horizontal.
3) Plating: in this process, every element of the weave has the same voice.  Together, these same elements create a form. Plating often begins flat and is very geometric. Hexagonal plating is a common shape seen in many woven forms.
4) Random weave: a weaving process which is based on a bird’s nest.  Miebach explained that the bird is the most incredible weaver because it creates the entire nest with only it’s beak.  The random weave is probably the most playful of the weaves and has a wide range of possibilities in that the weave can be either very dense or very open. The random weave is surprisingly solid and strong as well.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Miebach discussed materials in great depth during the workshop. She talked about reed as being a natural material which has a lot of pliability when worked with wet.  Hot water makes the reed pliable faster, but cold water is also effective. Listening to her slide show, it was amazing to hear the incredible range of materials weavers have used throughout history: wax linen, pandan leaves (from a coconut tree), watercolor paper, reed, wire, gimp, bamboo, wood, garden hoses, plastic cable ties, etc. The contextualization she provided by all of her examples from history and contemporary artists provided the perfect launching pad for everyone to start to create their own weaves. I will admit that my own knowledge and perspective on weaving was vastly limited, and it was wonderful to hear about the incredible range of possibilities in this process.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Miebach talked in depth about the process of weaving, and how in weaving you have to use your entire body. There are many ways to achieve the form: you can start from a solid object (like a box) and weave around the box to create the corm, and many baskets are woven on molds and even created in layers.  Tension of the material is a major concern in weaving, a lot of the weaving process has to do with learning about the tension of the material. Combining multiple weaving techniques together is common as well.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

One aspect Miebach pointed out was that every woven form will reveal to you how it was make, once you know what to look for you can figure it out.  She explained that the sign of a weaver is a person who will pick up a woven form and look at the bottom, since the bottom of the form is where the weave begins. Miebach also stressed that a lot of weaving is learned by making mistakes, since that’s how things get discovered and understood. She was also very encouraging about embracing mistakes, since they can sometimes have wonderful results.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop Sculptural Weaving Workshop Sculptural Weaving Workshop Sculptural Weaving Workshop Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Miebach gave a thorough demonstration on how to begin a woven sculpture with the reed.  This involved creating a round opening with the reed which would serve as the beginning point of the sculpture. From there, the random weave technique allows for tremendous flexibility in terms of process and form. I found working on my own piece during the workshop that the process was consuming and meditative at the same time.  The physicality involved with weaving was also exhilarating as well, Miebach described earlier in the day that you “weave with your entire body”.

Sculptural Weaving Workshop

Pieces created by workshop participants.  We were able to send everyone home with extra materials so the pieces could be finished at a later time.  Miebach explained that one of the most challenging aspects of the learning process is that weaving is highly demanding of your time.

Japanese Bento Box Workshop March 1, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Applied Arts.
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This past weekend we hosted the Japanese Bento Box workshop, taught by New York City artist Anna The Red. You can view a gallery of all of Anna’s bento creations on her bento blog. We had a lively crowd of 22 people at the workshop, which made for a wonderful and busy afternoon in the Lakehouse kitchen. Anna started us off with a handout of a simple pencil drawing which outlined the various parts of the bento we would be making. She explained that she always starts every one of her bento creations with a drawing to keep herself on track. Bento boxes which feature cute characters in Japan are made by parents to entice their children to eat their lunches.

Bento Box Workshop Demo

The bento that she planned for the workshop had several components, each of which is made separately and then assembled at the very end. The individual pieces were a mushroom carved from a radish, carrot flowers, a ham & cheese flower, broccoli “soot sprites” from the Japanese animated film “My Neighbor Totoro“, a grey Totoro made out of rice, snow pea “grass”, a heart made from a hot dog, a flower made from a hot dog, a white Totoro made out of a hard boiled egg, and a flower made from carrots and asparagus wrapped in bacon.

Bento Box Workshop Drawing

Each part of the bento involved a different technique. Anna had all sorts of simple tricks for how to create each of these pieces of the bento. She did a demonstration showing different ways of cutting hot dogs to transform them into flowers, an octopus, and a heart. An octopus is made by cutting long slits on one end of the hot dog and then dropping it in boiling water.  In the boiling water, the octopus’ legs flail outwards. The hot dog heart is made by cutting the ends of the hot dog at an angle so that when joined together, thye form a heart shape.  She made a polka-dotted mushroom by carving into a radish.  The dots on the mushroom are made by just carving small dots on the top of the radish. You can see a step-by-step “how to” on the radish mushroom on Anna’s bento blog.

Bento Box Workshop DemoBento Box Workshop

She had a great trick for dying the cooked rice grey:  she grinds up black sesame seeds.  When the ground black sesame seeds are mixed with rice, it turns to a grey color.  The Totoro made out of rice is created by packing the rice into saran wrap, which allows you to shape the Totoro without getting your hands sticky from the rice. Another smart trick was using a piece of uncooked pasta to insert through the ham flower to hold it into place.  The uncooked pasta actually will absorb some moisture from the ham, so that everything is edible.

Bento Box Workshop

A workshop participant adds pieces of seaweed to her bento with tweezers.

Anna explained that the smallest parts of the bento like the eyes/pupils and whiskers on the Totoro have to be placed on the bento after the bento has been fully assembled, this is to prevent these delicate pieces from getting moved during the assembly process. The pupils of the eyes are made by using a hole punch on a piece of seaweed. Seaweed is very susceptible to moisture, so picking up the seaweed pieces with your hands doesn’t work because of the moisture in your hands.  Tweezers allow you to pick up the seaweed pieces and gently place them in your bento. The whiskers are created by cutting the seaweed with scissors.  The eyes are created by using small bottle caps to cut into slices of Kraft american cheese.

Bento Box Workshop

Workshop participants are busy assembling their bento boxes.

Watching everyone assemble their final bento boxes was very exciting; although everyone had created the same components, no two designs were alike.  Lettuce was used as “filler” for the back of the bento box, and Anna noted that you can place other pieces of food underneath certain pieces to raise their height in the bento box.

Bento Boxes

The finished bento boxes created by the workshop participants; it’s amazing to think that everyone finished their creations within three hours!

Bento Boxes

Opening Reception for “Look at Me” February 5, 2010

Posted by claralieu in Opening Receptions, photography, Student Exhibitions.
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We had a terrific turnout this afternoon for the opening reception of the student photography exhibition “Look at Me”. The exhibition is open through Feb. 25th.  View more photos from the opening reception on our Flickr account.

"Look at Me": Opening Reception

A lively crowd was present throughout the opening reception.

"Look at Me": Opening Reception

Fall 2009 ARTS208 Photography course with Professor Christine Rogers.

"Look at Me": Opening Reception

Professor Christine Rogers talks about the themes and ideas behind the exhibition at the opening reception.

"Look at Me": Opening Reception

Emily Evans discusses the process and experience of curating the exhibition.

Guest Blog Post: Christine Rogers February 2, 2010

Posted by claralieu in photography, Student Exhibitions.
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Today’s post is a guest blog post from Photography 208 Professor Christine Rogers. Her class put together the current exhibition in the gallery “Look at Me”, which has an opening reception this Thursday, Feb. 4, 4:45-6pm.

Now that the show is hung on the wall I can’t help but be so proud of and inspired by my students from the Fall Photography 208 class. This show emerged out of a class assignment to curate themselves into a show. I wanted this to be a learning experience and for them to put together something that they could be proud of and they felt was representative of their work as individuals and as a group. The first phase was brainstorming and trying to come up with a theme to connect the projects. The second phase was to revisit the theme idea and instead organize the show visually and (somewhat conceptually) as throughout the semester projects evolved and the themes no longer felt appropriate.

Hanging the work on the wall was another phase of the curatorial process as we discovered last week. We stuck to the original map that we made in class but we had to edit heavily as there was more work than we had wall space. Ultimately this was for the best as these decisions helped to create a stronger final show where the viewer can spend time with each edited body of work as well as look at this as a cohesive show.

Thank you again to everyone who came out to help hang the show: Ji, Cecilia, Olivia, Sarah, Shannon, EB, Rayla, Eleri, Shirley and Emily. For those students who are studying abroad this semester, we will miss you on Thursday and we hope you like the installation!

Christine Rogers

Look at Me: Installation in Progress

Christine Rogers works with students to select works during the installation of  Look at Me